PERMANENT MUSEUM EXHIBITS

The Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Seminole Indian Museum’s 5000 square-foot space provides guests with an overview of Seminole life in the 1890s, with more than 40 life-size figures engaged in everything from hunting to traveling by canoe to dancing. Combined with scenic dioramas, historic artifacts, interpretive text panels and audio effects, visitors walk through displays that present specific aspects of Seminole culture. Brief descriptions of a few of the permanent displays are included here.

ORIENTATION THEATER

Become familiar with the dynamic history of the Florida Seminoles through the five-screen orientation film "We Seminoles," produced by the Seminole Tribe of Florida. Learn why the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum was created.

AUTUMN MORNING

Two Seminoles start out on an overnight hunt. To keep their packs light the men wear all the clothing they may need. They carry all the equipment necessary to make a modest hunting camp at a remote location

FROM THE LAND

In this exhibit, a young couple takes a glimpse at each other as the groom-to-be arrives at his future mother-in-law's camp.

THE HAPPY COUPLE

Harvests from the lands and parts of the animals are used to supply food, clothes, and tools. When items could not be gained from the Everglades, the Seminoles would trade with a handful of store owners.

A MEAL IN THE CHICKEE

Under the chickee is a glimpse of traditional meal time, where multiple generations gathered around their food. The camp is characterized by numerous chickees, which in Miccosukee means house. The Seminoles used a separate dwelling for each daily routine.

THE COOKING FIRE

In the center of the gallery, three women are busy around a fire preparing the daily meal. This fire, if properly tended to, could last for weeks.

POLIN' DOWN THE RIVER

Wearing some of their finest clothes, this family glides down a quiet stretch of river in their full size dug-out canoe on their way to a trading post.

ALL THAT GLITTERS

Using incredible skill and a steady hand our Seminole silversmith heats a coin on a small fire, pounding the coin into decorative pieces and jewelry.

THE CATFISH DANCE

Get a unique glimpse into the sacred religious tradition of the Green Corn Ceremony, an annual event which is still celebrated among the Seminole Tribe today. Enter the ceremonial grounds and view fifteen life size figures dressed in colorful period dress in the midst of performing the Catfish Dance.

THE STICK BALL GAME

Experience the frenzy of the Seminole Stickball Game! On the first evening of the Green Corn Ceremony, as the coming evening cools the heat of a June day, the young adults gather to engage in this vigorous contest.

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